Les Parfums de Jacques Fath 1945 – 1953

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Chasuble and Green Water, Les Parfums Jacques Fath, photographed by Herbert Gehr for Life Magazine, September 1949

Chasuble and Green Water, Les Parfums Jacques Fath, photographed by Herbert Gehr for Life Magazine, September 1949

During his lifetime, Jacques Fath, the “little prince” of post war Parisian couture, would see seven perfumes released for Les Parfums de Jacques Fath between 1945 and 1954. Two of the most famous fragrances, Iris Gris and Green Water, were created by Vincent Roubert, who also composed Knize Ten in 1924 and Coty’s answer to Chanel No. 5, L’Aimant in 1927.  He also worked with Coty on L’Or (1912), A’Suma (1934), and Metéor (1949).

“Simply stated, the problem with iris-root smell is this: everyone loves its gray, nostalgic, romantic powderiness, but the stuff is, truth be told, as funereal as it gets.  The great Vincent Roubert solved the problem in 1947 with Jacques Fath’s Iris Gris by adding the lactonic peach base Persicol and endowing the grayness of iris with the pink shimmer of a pigeon’s throat.”  Luca Turin

The first fragrance launched by the house in 1945 was the woody, floral oriental Chasuble followed by the now legendary Iris Gris, Torrent, and the aromatic, citrus Green Water in 1947.  1950 saw the release of Canasta a fruity chypre suspected to have also been created by Roubert.

The final perfume Jacques Fath would see before passing away in 1954 was the oriental scent Fath de Fath (1953) which was re-released in 1993.

Les Parfums de Jacques Fath vintage perfume porn…

René Gruau’s illustrations for Jacques Fath were my original inspiration for putting this post together. Even though, these two are not perfume related, I think they’re really fantastic. The pink one is part of my collection of Gruau ads…

Jacques Fath (1912 – 1954) is considered of the three most influential couturiers of post war France. The others being Christian Dior and Pierre Balmain.  At 25 years old, the self taught designer started his business in a small studio at 32 Rue la Boétie.

Jacques Fath, Herbert Gehr, September 1949 for Life Magazine

Jacques Fath, Herbert Gehr, September 1949 for Life Magazine

Fath’s rise to fame came about after Vogue spotted his wife, Geneniéve Boucher de la Bruyére, a former secretary to Coco Chanel, wearing one of his designs at the Grande Nuit de Longchamps. “He is inspired. He has vision. He will succeed.”

Jacques remained in Paris during the German occupation, designing tartan tunic dresses and peasant skirts to mock the German soldiers.  From the photos I have seen, Fath did seem like he had a great sense of humour.

During his career, Jacques hired Hubert de Givenchy, Guy Laroche, and Valentino, all of whom would go on to found their now iconic design houses.


 

Photo credits:

The always wonderful hprints.com and PhotoPleasure.wordpress.com

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